The Institute’s 2017 Spring Seminar Series features courses on qualitative research methods in the first week (April 25 – May 1) and a survey research course in the second (May 2 – 5). In addition, there is a Short Course on the Research Data Centre at York (May 2 and 9), introductory courses on SAS (May 3 – 24) and SPSS (May 5 – 26), and a course on longitudinal data analysis (May 8 -12).

The qualitative research courses begin in the first week with a one-day seminar illustrating the wide range of approaches to the collection, recording, management and interpretation of qualitative data.  On the second day seminar and workshop activities deal with the further interpretation of qualitative data, including textual materials from interviews, focus groups and various other sources. One particular and very popular method of data collection in qualitative research, focus groups, is fully discussed on the third day of this week. The final two days of this series comprise a two-day workshop, introducing the computerized analysis of textual materials using NVivo, the most common software for this type of analysis.

The survey research course comprises a four-day workshop on the design, implementation and analysis of survey research projects. On the first two days, general design principles for surveys are discussed in the context of social science research in general, with particular reference to sample and questionnaire design. The following two days are devoted to the execution of an analytical design appropriate to the surveys chosen as exemplary models of this research process, emphasizing a hands-on approach to survey data analysis in the lab. We recommend that participants register for the complete four-day survey research workshop.

The more statistical courses emphasize data resources and programming for analysis. We begin with two sessions on the use of Statistics Canada and international data sources at the Research Data Centre at York University. Then, introductory SAS (Wednesdays) and SPSS (Fridays) courses, over a four-week period, are designed to equip participants to undertake basic statistical analysis of quantitative data. The final course in this set deals with longitudinal data analysis, especially growth curve models, in a series of four meetings in one week.

These courses provide a hands-on approach to help researchers develop practical skills. They attract an interesting mix of graduate students, researchers from government and NGOs, faculty, and university staff. In our teaching we strive to provide a successful introduction to each topic, while offering new insights for more experienced researchers.

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
(April 25 TO May 1, 2017)

Approaches to Qualitative Data

COURSE FULL: register for waiting list only.

Instructor: Darla Rhyne, PhD
Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Times: 9:30am-Noon; 1:00pm-3:30pm
Location: Room 5082, Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (Formerly TEL Bldg)
Enrolment Limit: 20

This course considers strategies for understanding qualitative data. While touching on various analytic stances, such as descriptive analysis, grounded theory, ethnography and postmodern research, the course focuses on practical ways to deal with field notes, interview and focus group transcripts, written materials (diaries, meeting minutes), film and other objects. It is organized around the themes of keeping track of what you are doing, what you are finding and how you are feeling about it.

Using a number of hands-on examples, the seminar pays special attention to the initial stages of analysis and to coding, and memoing as integral components of the process. It is well suited to those relatively new to qualitative analysis. Participants are welcome to discuss their own research as it relates to issues raised during the course.

About the Instructor
Darla Rhyne, PhD, is a Research Associate Emerita at ISR. With a background in Anthropology and Sociology, she has considerable expertise with qualitative research methods including community fieldwork, participant observation, depth interviewing, focus groups and the coding and analysis of qualitative data. Her own research has been primarily in the areas of community, family and ethnic studies, education, recreation, the quality of life and health studies. At the Institute, her research included program and policy evaluations, needs assessments and exploratory research in a variety of areas such as smoking cessation and prevention, education, immigration and social assistance.

Interpreting and Reporting Qualitative Data: An Overview

Instructors: Professors Les Jacobs and Brenda Jacobs
Date: Wednesday, April 26, 2017
Time: 9:30am-Noon; 1:00-3:30pm
Location: Room 1005, Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (Formerly TEL Bldg)
Enrolment Limit: 30

This course offers a broad overview of the major issues in the interpretation and analysis of qualitative social science research materials such as field notes, transcripts of in-depth interviews and focus groups, and documentary and archival information. The focus of the course is an extension of the processes discussed earlier in the course on ‘Approaches to Qualitative Data’ (April 25th), with an emphasis on writing up the final version, including a review of various formats and approaches, the voice of the author and reflexivity, addressing issues of intersectionality in personal identity information such as intersections between race and gender, and ethical and confidentiality issues. Several hands-on exercises will be undertaken.

The seminar presents a conceptual orientation to qualitative data analysis from varying disciplines (especially political science, education, sociology, and law), analytical stances (critical discourse analysis and narrative analysis), and areas of substantive focus (health, law and society, human rights, social policy, schools and education). Class participants are encouraged to discuss their own research projects in the context of issues raised throughout the course, which is suited to those wishing to know more about interpretive analysis in general.

About the Instructors
Les Jacobs is Professor of Law & Society and Political Science at York, and the Director of the Institute for Social Research. He completed his PhD at Oxford University in 1990. His research is currently focused on legal problems in everyday life, access to justice, and anti-racism.

Brenda Jacobs is a PhD Candidate in Education at York University. Her doctoral research is focused on how emergent curriculum inquiries support the children’s ability to self-regulate in Full-Day Kindergarten. Brenda works with Teacher Candidates in the B.Ed. program at York and is a part-time professor at Seneca College in the School of Early Childhood Education. She completed her B.A. and B.Ed. at the University of Western Ontario and her M.Ed. at York University. Brenda is also a member of the Ontario College of Teachers and the College of Early Childhood Educators. Previously she taught elementary school-aged children for over twenty years in Oxford, England, Vancouver, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario.

Conducting Focus Groups for Social Research

COURSE FULL: registration is closed.

Instructor: Darla Rhyne, PhD
Date: Thursday, April 27, 2017
Time: 9:30am-Noon; 1:00-3:30pm
Location: Room 5082, Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (Formerly TEL Bldg)
Enrolment Limit: 20

This seminar is an introduction to focus group research. The morning session deals with the basic features of focus group planning and implementation, including current applications, strengths and weaknesses, ethical considerations, and the stages of focus group research. The afternoon session looks at a number of practical aspects of conducting focus groups, including appropriate settings, selecting and recruiting participants, developing a discussion guide, recording focus groups, and moderator techniques.

There will be opportunities for participants to discuss focus group research they have conducted or may be considering. The workshop will include some hands-on focus group practice. This presentation is suitable for students, faculty, staff and other researchers who are considering focus group research for the first time, and also for researchers wanting to refresh their knowledge of this method.

About the Instructor
Darla Rhyne, PhD, is Research Associate Emerita at ISR. With a background in Anthropology and Sociology, she has considerable expertise with qualitative research methods including community fieldwork, participant observation, depth interviewing, focus groups and the coding and analysis of qualitative data. Her own research has been primarily in the areas of community, family and ethnic studies, education, recreation, the quality of life and health studies. At the Institute, her research included program and policy evaluations, needs assessments and exploratory research in a variety of areas such as smoking cessation and prevention, education, immigration and social assistance.

Using Computers in Qualitative Analysis: An NVivo 11 for Windows Workshop

COURSE FULL: registration is closed.

Instructor: Marshia Akbar, PhD
Dates: Friday April 28, 2017 and Monday May 1, 2017
Time: 9:30am-Noon; 1:00pm-3:30pm
Location: Lab 2004, Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (Formerly TEL Bldg)
Enrolment Limit: 20

This hands-on Workshop will provide both a basic and advanced introduction to NVivo 11 for Windows. As this Workshop will focus on how to move forward into your analysis, participants are required to have had some prior experience and/or exposure to qualitative research assumptions, theories and methods before attending this Workshop. The overall objective is to provide you with the tools to ensure that the theory and methods guiding your project remain central as you move into NVivo.

On Day One you will create a project and learn how to import and work with a wide range of qualitative data formats (e.g., interview transcripts, focus group transcripts, survey spreadsheets, etc). On Day Two you will learn how to organize and explore your material, use advanced queries, identify relationships and use charts to show patterns in your information. Time will be provided on both days of the Workshop for participants to work with their own data.

Please note this course is designed for NVivo 11 for Windows users (and not NVIvo for Mac users). NVivo for Mac has different features and cross platform limitations.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in the lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each day, participants need to arrive on time, attend all sessions and must bring a USB key to save work.

About the Instructor
Marshia Akbar is a research coordinator at the Center of Excellence for Research on Migration and Settlement (CERIS) at York University. Her research interests have focused on the social and economic integration of immigrants in Canada. She received her doctorate degree in Geography from York University with specialization in qualitative research methods. Her expertise in Nvivo 10 and 11 has helped her analyze qualitative data for her PhD dissertation, as well as for the on-going Toronto Second Generation project funded by SSHRC.

SURVEY RESEARCH METHODS
(May 2 TO 5, 2017)

The Survey Research Process, Questionnaire Design and Data Analysis

Instructors: Professor Bryn Greer-Wootten and Mirka Ondrack, MSc
Dates: Tuesday May 2 – Friday May 5, 2017
Times: 9:30am-Noon; 1:00pm-3:30pm
Location: Lab 2114, Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (Formerly TEL Bldg)
Enrolment Limit: 25

Survey research is one of the many methodological possibilities that can be considered in the decision processes for carrying out social research, for any phenomena of interest: hence, it must be contextualized. Commonly, it is located within the philosophical criteria employed in social research, i.e., taking into account the ontological, epistemological and methodological aspects of any research project. These general principles are discussed on the first day of this four-day Workshop, with examples drawn from many social science areas using quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research designs. The afternoon group activity is based on a design exercise for several substantive issues. On the second day, there is a focus on the questionnaire design elements of survey research, with some attention also paid to sample design issues. The group activities on this day involve the reconstruction of a conceptual framework for one of the two model surveys used throughout the course.

The practical analysis of survey research data is presented in the next two days. First, we explore the properties of the data, using a matrix representation of the survey data, including levels of measurement for typical survey questions, the distributional properties of variables and simple descriptive statistics. Subsequently, the construction of scales (e.g., for attitude items) and the fundamentals of statistical inference and hypothesis testing in a survey context are developed. The final day continues with the implementation of a survey analysis design, including the analysis of groups (e.g., gender differences using t-tests; age or regional differentials using the analysis of variance), and extended analyses of contingency tables, the most common form of data representation in surveys.

On these analysis days, the morning sessions are used for lectures and demonstrations; afternoon lab sessions involve individual assignments that replicate procedures used in the morning, for a different data set. To benefit from the course, participants should have some background knowledge in basic statistics or the fundamentals of survey research, as well as some prior knowledge of SPSS.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in the lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each day, participants need to arrive on time and attend all sessions.

About the Instructors
Bryn Greer-Wootten is Professor Emeritus in Environmental Studies and Geography at York University. In 2002 he joined the staff of the Statistical Consulting Service, where he is currently an Associate Coordinator, and in 2004 was appointed an Associate Director of ISR. He has taught and carried out quantitative and qualitative research, with a particular interest in survey research, especially for environmental and social policy, for over fifty years.

Mirka Ondrack is Statistical Consultant Emerita at ISR. She received her Master’s degree in Physics from Masaryk University in the Czech Republic. She has held the position of Programmer/Analyst at ISR since 1971. Ms. Ondrack is currently a consultant with the Statistical Consulting Service and also does custom programming and data analysis, consulting in statistical analysis and computing using SPSS and SAS.

SCS SHORT COURSES
(May 2 TO May 26, 2017)

Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics

Sorry, this course has been cancelled.

Instructors: Sara Tumpane, MA, Walter Giesbrecht, MLIS, Valerie Preston, PhD and Hugh McCague, PhD
Dates: May 2 and 9, 2017 (Tuesdays)
Time: 9:00am – 12:30pm
Location: Classroom, Research Data Centre (RDC), Statistics Canada, York Lanes 283B
Enrolment Limit: 20

This course introduces you to the high quality data and statistics available through Canadian and international government statistical agencies, academic survey institutes, and other sources. A major focus of this course is on Statistics Canada data which provide a broad coverage of current and historical aspects of Canadian society. These Statistics Canada resources are accessible through a public website and a secure Research Data Centre (RDC) at York University that holds detailed confidential data (micro-data) from over 80 household and population surveys. In order to assist you in determining which surveys may be relevant to your research, an overview of the Statistics Canada public use data and the secure RDC data will be given, including for example, the National Population Health Survey, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, and the General Social Survey. Additionally, resources for accessing other Canadian and international data sources will be discussed and illustrated. This course will cover the practical issues involved in searching, accessing and handling data, and important resources such as codebooks providing complete information on the data and variables. You are encouraged to bring a laptop computer and to work on the in-class exercises involving accessing data in your subject area of interest.

About the Instructors
Valerie Preston is Professor of Geography at York University where she teaches urban social geography, Associate Director of the Institute for Social Research, and Academic Director of the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre at York University. She was also Director of the Institute for Social Research, York Director for CERIS – The Ontario Metropolis Centre and the Graduate Program Director in Geography. Her research examines gendered and racialized aspects of migration and settlement and their impacts on Canadian cities. Currently, she is the project director for “Migration and Resilience in Urban Canada,” a partnership funded by SSHRC to create and disseminate new knowledge about international migration and settlement trends in urban Canada.

Walter Giesbrecht is the Data Librarian in the Scott Library at York University. He helps students, staff, and faculty to find the data and statistics sources they need for their research and assignments. Often such sources include reference to the Public Use Master Files, but sometimes involve referrals to the Research Data Centre at York. His research interests cover data and statistical literacy.

Sara Tumpane is the SC-appointed Analyst at the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre on the York University campus. Sara is also a PhD Candidate in the Department of Economics at the university, with a research focus on quantitative research in health and environmental economics.

Hugh McCague is a Data Analyst and Statistical Consultant at the Institute for Social Research and Statistical Consulting Service at York University. His work and research concentrate on applications of statistics in health and environmental studies, including the use of data at the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre at York University, as well as the on-going public health surveys of the Institute. He is the Secretary of the Southern Ontario Regional Association of the Statistical Society of Canada and the Southern Ontario Chapter of the American Statistical Association.

An Introduction to SAS for Windows

Instructor: Ryan Barnhart, MA
Dates: May 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2017 (Wednesdays)
Time: 1:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: Steacie Instructional Lab, Room 021, Steacie Science Library
Enrolment Limit: 35

This short course provides an introduction to the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) syntax commands and procedures. We will cover the basics of: reading, transforming, sorting, merging and saving data files in some common formats; selecting cases, and modifying and computing variables; performing some basic statistical procedures and tests such as descriptive statistics, correlations, contingency tables, Chi-square tests, t-tests, ANOVA and linear regression; creating bar charts and scatter plots; composing simple macros for tailored procedures; and saving output results and work in some common formats.

This course is designed for participants with some introductory level statistical knowledge, but no previous experience in using SAS. Please note that while this course will focus on the implementation of introductory statistics in SAS, it is not intended as a review of basic statistics. This short course will get you well underway in using SAS.

Please note that the Steacie Instructional Lab [Steacie 021] is accessed by entering Steacie Library and then proceeding to the basement of that Library.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in Steacie Library and the Steacie Instructional Lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each day, participants need to arrive on time and attend all sessions.

SAS course materials

About the Instructor
Ryan Barnhart is a PhD candidate in Psychology at York University with the specialization in Quantitative Methods. His research interests and statistical work have focused on longitudinal data analysis using multilevel modeling and generalized linear multilevel modeling. This work has helped Ryan to develop a multi-platform approach to using statistical software, including SAS, STATA, R and SPSS.

An Introduction to SPSS

Registration is now closed.

Instructor: Marina Rain, MA
Dates: May 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2017 (Fridays)
Time: 9:00am – 12:30pm
Location: Steacie Instructional Lab, Room 021, Steacie Science Library
Enrolment Limit: 35

This course aims to acquaint participants with IBM SPSS Statistics, a popular and respected program for analyzing data that is used across a range of disciplines. The curriculum has been recently revised to not only introduce the basic functions and features of the software (including data entry and manipulation), but also to demonstrate how to conduct a range of statistical analyses. Hands-on exercises will supplement the lecture material.

The curriculum for this course is designed to be an applied introduction to a statistical program; as such, familiarity with basic statistical procedures (e.g., t-tests, ANOVA, regression) is assumed. Further, participants are encouraged to bring a USB flash drive to store their work.

Please note that the Steacie Instructional Lab [Steacie 021] is accessed by entering Steacie Library and then proceeding to the basement of that Library.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in Steacie Library and the Steacie Instructional Lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each day, participants need to arrive on time and attend all sessions.

Download the SPSS course data in a zip file.

About the Instructor
Marina Rain is a PhD candidate in Psychology at York University. She currently serves as the statistical consultant to the Honours Thesis students in the Department of Psychology. She is proficient in SPSS and R.

Longitudinal Data Analysis with Growth Curve Models

Sorry, this course has been cancelled.

Instructor: Professor David Flora
Dates: May 8, 9, 11 and 12, 2017 (Mon -Tue, Thu – Fri)
Time: 1:30pm – 4:00pm
Location: Room 163, Behavioural Science Building (BSB)
Enrolment Limit: 16

There are many methods available for analyzing longitudinal and repeated measures data, but growth curve modeling (GCM) has rapidly become one of the most popular because its generality and flexibility allows GCM to handle data from many different types of longitudinal studies and many different research questions. In this short course, we will see how GCMs can be specified and estimated using either a structural equation modeling (SEM) or multilevel modeling (MLM) approach. Although this short course is classroom-based, software examples using R will be presented. Course participants are expected to have a strong background in multiple regression analysis and experience with SEM is also beneficial.

About the Instructor
David Flora is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Quantitative Methods Area in the Department of Psychology at York University and Joint Coordinator of the Statistical Consulting Service. His research interests include longitudinal data analysis, psychometric analysis, factor analysis, and structural equation modeling.

Course Fees

All fees include HST.

York students (with FAS account)
  • Approaches to Qualitative Data … $50.85
  • Interpreting and Reporting Qualitative Data: An Overview … $50.85
  • Conducting Focus Groups for Social Research … $50.85
  • An NVivo 11 for Windows Workshop … $101.70
  • The Survey Research Process and Data Analysis … $203.40
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $56.50
  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $90.40
  • An Introduction to SPSS … $90.40
  • Longitudinal Data Analysis with Growth Curve Models … $90.40
York faculty and staff
  • Approaches to Qualitative Data … $113.00
  • Interpreting and Reporting Qualitative Data: An Overview … $113.00
  • Conducting Focus Groups for Social Research … $113.00
  • An NVivo 11 for Windows Workshop … $226.00
  • The Survey Research Process and Data Analysis … $452.00
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $56.50
  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $198.88
  • An Introduction to SPSS … $198.88
  • Longitudinal Data Analysis with Growth Curve Models … $198.88
Full-time students at other post-secondary institutions

For non-York students, a lab access fee of $33.90 has been included.

  • Approaches to Qualitative Data … $96.05
  • Interpreting and Reporting Qualitative Data: An Overview … $96.05
  • Conducting Focus Groups for Social Research … $96.05
  • An NVivo 11 for Windows Workshop … $226.00
  • The Survey Research Process and Data Analysis … $418.10
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $90.40
  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $192.10
  • An Introduction to SPSS … $192.10
  • Longitudinal Data Analysis with Growth Curve Models … $158.20
External participants

For external participants, a lab access fee of $33.90 has been included.

  • Approaches to Qualitative Data … $198.88
  • Interpreting and Reporting Qualitative Data: An Overview … $198.88
  • Conducting Focus Groups for Social Research … $198.88
  • An NVivo 11 for Windows Workshop … $431.66
  • The Survey Research Process and Data Analysis … $829.42
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $90.40
  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $431.66
  • An Introduction to SPSS … $431.66
  • Longitudinal Data Analysis with Growth Curve Models … $397.76

See the registration form for payment options.

Refunds are available upon three business days’ notice prior to the course start date and are subject to an administrative fee.

Please review our policy regarding refunds.

Certificate of Completion
Available on request, full attendance is required.
A $5.65 administrative fee applies, for each certificate requested.

Registration

You can register for courses by completing the on-line registration form, which is date-stamped.

You can register in person (weekdays, from 10:00am to 12:00pm or 2:00pm to 4:00pm), please see:

Betty Tai
Room 5075
Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (DB)

To register by mail, print a blank registration form, complete, and send to:

Betty Tai
Institute for Social Research
Room 5075
Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (DB)

York University
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON M3J 1P3
Canada

You may also fax a completed registration form to: 416-736-5749.

Additional Information

Additional information regarding registration, contact Institute for Social Research (ISR) by telephone at 416-736-5061, weekdays, from 10:00am to 12:00pm or 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Directions to York University (Keele Campus), building and parking lot locations.

Additional information on parking.