The Institute for Social Research’s Statistical Consulting Service provides consultation on a broad range of statistical problems and on the use of computers for statistical analysis. Its services extend beyond the social sciences to other disciplines that make use of statistics. Consultation is available to assist in research design, data collection, data analysis, statistical computing, and the presentation of statistical material.

Consultation is provided by a group of faculty drawn from York University’s Departments of Psychology, Mathematics and Statistics and Geography, and the School of Kinesiology and Health Science, in conjunction with full-time professional staff at ISR. The faculty and staff have extensive experience with many forms of statistical analysis. Topics for which assistance is available include regression analysis, multivariate analysis, analysis of categorical data, structural equation modeling, factor analysis, multilevel/mixed modeling, survey data and longitudinal data, experimental design, survey sampling and statistical computing.

Three times a year, the Statistical Consulting Service offers short courses on various aspects of statistics and statistical computing, including regular introductions to the SPSS and SAS statistical packages. Recent course offerings have addressed factor analysis, structural equation modeling, graphical methods for categorical data, introduction to the R programming language and mixed models.

The Statistical Consulting Service maintains a regular schedule of office hours during the academic year. The Service primarily serves the York University community; for others, consultation is available on a fee-for-service basis.  Please go to the Institute’s SCS website to make appointments online with SCS consultants.

Pre-registration and payment of fees is required for all Short Courses

SCS SHORT COURSES

An Introduction to SAS for Windows

Instructor: Professor Chris Ardern
Course Dates: Fridays – February 1, 8, 15 and March 1 (8 if necessary) 2019
Course Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm
Course Location: Steacie Instructional Lab, Room 021, Steacie Science Library
Enrolment Limit: 35

Course Description:  This Short Course provides an introduction to the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) syntax commands and procedures. We will cover the basics of:

– reading, transforming, sorting, merging and saving data files in some common formats;
– selecting cases, and modifying and computing variables;
– performing some basic statistical procedures and tests such as descriptive statistics, correlations, contingency tables, Chi-square tests, t-tests, ANOVA and linear regression;
– creating bar charts and scatter plots;
– composing simple macros for tailored procedures; and
– saving output results and work in some common formats.

This course is designed for participants with some introductory level statistical knowledge, but no previous experience in using SAS. Please note that while this course will focus on the implementation of introductory statistics in SAS, it is not intended as a review of basic statistics. This hands-on short course will get you well underway in using SAS.

Please note that the Steacie Instructional Lab [Steacie 021] is accessed by entering Steacie Library and then proceeding to the basement of that Library.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in Steacie Library and the Steacie Instructional Lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each class, course participants need to arrive on time and attend the entire session.

Click here for the SAS course materials

About the Instructor:  Chris Ardern is a Professor in the School of Kinesiology and Health Science. His primary research interests include the epidemiology of physical activity, obesity and cardiometabolic risk. Most recently, his work has focused on the use of risk algorithms, behavioural profiling, and geospatial analysis for the identification of high-risk subgroups of the population. Much of this work involves the harmonization of large national level surveys and routinely collected administrative and clinical data to examine temporal relationships in SAS.

An Applied Introduction to SPSS

Instructor: Professor Rob Cribbie
Course Dates: Wednesdays – January 23 and 30, February 6 and 13, 2019 
Course Time: 8:30 – 11:30am
Course Location: 159 Behavioural Sciences Building (Hebb Computer Lab)
Enrolment Limit: 20

Course description:  This course aims to acquaint participants with IBM SPSS Statistics, a popular and respected program for analyzing data that is used across a range of disciplines. The curriculum has been revised to not only introduce the basic functions and features of the software (including data entry and manipulation), but also to demonstrate how to conduct a range of statistical analyses. Hands-on exercises will supplement the lecture material.

The curriculum for this course is designed to be an applied introduction to a statistical program; as such, familiarity with basic statistical procedures (e.g., t-tests, ANOVA, regression) is assumed. Further, participants are encouraged to bring a USB flash drive to store their work.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in the Hebb Lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each class, course participants need to arrive on time and attend the entire session.

Click here to download the SPSS course data in a zip file

About the Instructor:  Rob Cribbie is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at York University. He received his PhD in Quantitative Psychology from the University of Manitoba. His research interests include multiple comparison procedures, robust ANOVA strategies, and structural equation modeling.

Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics

Instructors: Walter Giesbrecht, MLIS, Valerie Preston, PhD and Hugh McCague, PhD
Course Dates: Tuesdays – February 26 and March 5, 2019
Course Time: 9:00am-12:30pm
Course Location: Research Data Centre (RDC), Statistics Canada, York Lanes 283B
Enrolment Limit: 20
Enrolment Minimum: At least five registrants are required in order to hold the course.

Course description:  This course introduces you to the high quality data and statistics available through Canadian and international government statistical agencies, academic survey institutes, and as well as emerging Big Data sources. The course focuses on Statistics Canada data which provide a broad coverage of current and historical aspects of Canadian society. The Statistics Canada resources are accessible through a public website and a secure Research Data Centre (RDC) at York University that holds detailed confidential micro-data from over 80 household and population surveys and the census master files. In order to assist you in determining which data may be relevant to your research, the Statistics Canada public use data and secure RDC data will be reviewed. For example, the Census, the National Population Health Survey, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, and various General Social Surveys will be discussed. Resources for accessing other Canadian and international data including Big Data sources will be introduced. The course will cover the practical issues involved in searching, accessing and handling data, and important resources such as codebooks that offer complete information about the data. You are encouraged to bring a laptop computer to work on the in-class exercises to access data in your subject area of interest.

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each class, course participants need to arrive on time and attend the entire session.

About the Instructors:
Valerie Preston is Professor of Geography at York University where she teaches urban social geography, Associate Director of the Institute for Social Research, and Academic Director of the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre at York University. She was also Director of the Institute for Social Research, York Director for CERIS – The Ontario Metropolis Centre and the Graduate Program Director in Geography. Her research examines gendered and racialized aspects of migration and settlement and their impacts on Canadian cities. Currently, she is the project Director for “Building Migrant Resilience in Canadian, Cities / Immigration et Réslience en Mileu Urbain”, a partnership funded by SSHRC to create and disseminate new knowledge about international migration and settlement trends in cities.

Walter Giesbrecht is the Data Librarian in the Scott Library at York University. He helps students, staff, and faculty to find the data and statistics sources they need for their research and assignments. Often such sources include reference to the Public Use Master Files, but sometimes involve referrals to the Research Data Centre at York.  His research interests cover data and statistical literacy.

Hugh McCague is a statistician at the Institute for Social Research and Statistical Consulting Service at York University. His work and research concentrate on applications of statistics in health and environmental studies, including the use of data at the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre at York University, as well as the on-going public health surveys of the Institute. He is the Secretary of the Southern Ontario Regional Association of the Statistical Society of Canada and the Southern Ontario Chapter of the American Statistical Association.

Using Computers in Qualitative Analysis: An NVivo 12 for Windows Workshop

Instructor: Stella Park, MA
Dates: Friday March 8 AND Monday March 11, 2019
Time: 9:30am-Noon; 1:00pm-3:30pm
Location: Room 2004, Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building
Enrolment Limit: 20

Course Description:  This hands-on Workshop will provide both a basic and advanced introduction to NVivo 12 for Windows. As this Workshop will focus on how to move forward into your analysis, participants are required to have had some prior experience and/or exposure to qualitative assumptions, theories and methods before attending this Workshop. The overall objective of this two-day (note: both morning and afternoon) course is to provide you with the tools to ensure that the theory and methods guiding your project remain central as you move into NVivo.

On Day One you will create a project and learn how to import and work with a wide range of qualitative data formats (e.g. interview transcripts, focus group transcripts, survey spreadsheets, web content, etc.). On Day Two you will learn how to organize and explore your material, use advanced queries, identify relationships, use models and charts to show patterns in your information, and create reports. Time will be provided on both days of the Workshop for participants to work with their own data, and the Instructor will respond to questions related to your specific projects.

Please note this course is designed for NVivo 12 for Windows users (and not NVivo for Mac users). NVivo for Mac has different features and cross platform limitations.

Please note that food and drink are not allowed in the lab. The only exceptions are capped bottles of water (not juice/pop) and spill proof mugs (not cups of coffee).

Because these materials are presented sequentially and build upon the basics presented at the beginning of each of the two days, participants need to arrive on time and attend both sessions.

About the Instructor:  Stella Park is a Project Manager at ISR. She has over 10 years of experience in conducting both quantitative and qualitative research projects at the local, provincial, and international levels, on a diverse range of topics, including health, education, employment, and the non-profit sector.  Stella has used NVivo to analyze large provincial-wide qualitative studies, including the YouthREX project, funded by the Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services, ONN’s Nonprofit Labour Force study, and CAMH’s Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. She has also used NVivo to analyze various York-university campus projects.

Course Fees

All fees include HST.

York students (with FAS account)
  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $122.04
  • An Applied Introduction to SPSS … $122.04
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $56.50
  • An NVivo Workshop … $226.00
York faculty and staff
  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $271.20
  • An Applied Introduction to SPSS … $271.20
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $56.50
  • An NVivo Workshop … $452.00
Full-time students at other post-secondary institutions

For non-York students, a lab access fee of $33.90 (including HST) has been included.

  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $246.34
  • An Applied Introduction to SPSS … $246.34
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $90.40
  • An NVivo Workshop … $372.90
External participants

For external participants, a lab access fee of $33.90 (including HST) has been included.

  • An Introduction to SAS for Windows … $531.10
  • An Applied Introduction to SPSS … $531.10
  • Accessing Canadian and International Data and Statistics … $90.40
  • An NVivo Workshop … $711.90

See the registration form for payment options.

Refunds are available upon three business days’ notice prior to the course start date and are subject to an administrative fee.

Please review our policy regarding refunds.

Certificate of Completion

Available on request, full attendance is required.
A $5.65 administrative fee applies, for each certificate requested.

Registration

You can register for courses by completing the on-line registration form, which is date-stamped.

You can register in person (weekdays, from 10:00am to 12:00pm or 2:00pm to 4:00pm), please see:

Betty Tai
Room 5075
Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (DB)

To register by mail, print a blank registration form, complete, and send to:

Betty Tai
Institute for Social Research
Room 5075
Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building (DB)

York University
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, ON M3J 1P3
Canada

You may also fax a completed registration form to: 416-736-5749.

Additional Information

Additional information regarding registration, contact Institute for Social Research (ISR) by telephone at 416-736-5061, weekdays, from 10:00am to 12:00pm or 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Directions to York University (Keele Campus), building and parking lot locations.

Additional information on parking.